How Canada’s Offer Was Made, Timeline, In The First World War (FWW), Aug. 1914.

Canada at War

 

Timeline July 28th 1914, post outbreak of War:

FWW roots were on July 28, 1914, when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. The small conflict between both countries rapidly cascaded: soon, Germany, Russia, Great Britain, and France, owing their involvement in treaties, obligated them to defend certain states. The western and eastern front hastily opened along, Austria-Hungary and Germany boarder.

 

The Western and Eastern Fronts.

In the first month of conflict, rapid troop movements, reckless attacks were carried out on both fronts. Germany inflicted the first blow in the west, attacking Belgium and then France, while in the east, Russia attacked both Germany and Austria-Hungary. In the south, Austria-Hungary attacked Serbia, as the dust settled in the Battle of, Marne (Sept. 5–9, 1914), trenches were dug in the western front in central France as the eastern front soon afterwards, fallowed the status quo.

28/06/1914: Archduke Francis Ferdinand heir to the Austria-Hungary throne and his wife are assassinated by a Serbian Nationalist in Sarejevo.

05/07/1914: Kaiser William II promises German support for Austria against Serbia.

28/07/1914: Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary declares war on Russia, and Serbia.

29/07/1914: Russia begins to mobilise her armed forces. Austria-Hungarian troops invade Serbia.

30/07/1914: The Tsar signs order at 4 p.m. for mobilization of Russian Army.

31/07/1914: Russian Govt, order general mobilization. Belgian Government order mobilization Austro-Hungarian Government order general mobilization. German Govt. send ultimatum to Russia (presented at midnight 31st/1st).

01/08/1914: Official outbreak of First World War, German Government order general mobilization and declare war on Russia. French Government order general mobilization.

02/08/1914: Germany invades Luxembourg, German Government send ultimatum to Belgium demanding passage through Belgian territory.

03/08/1914: Belgian Govt. refuses German demand. Germany declares war on France. British Govt. order general mobilization. Italy declares neutrality. British Government guarantee armed support to Belgium should Germany violate Belgian neutrality. Turkey signs secret treaty of alliance with Germany.

04/08/1914: Germany declared war on neutral Belgium, violating a treaty signed by Prussia, Fritz invades in a right flanking, designed to defeat France quickly. Germany actions, the British declares war on Germany and Austria-Hungary. Canada joins the British war, while U.S President Woodrow Wilson declares American neutrality.

04/08/1914: The British Expeditionary Force lands in France assisting Belgium and French, German troops cross Belgian frontier and attack Liege.

06/08/1914: “Battle of the Frontiers” begins in France.

07/08/1914: First units of the British Expeditionary Force land in France.

14/08/1914: The Battle of the Frontiers erupts. Battles of Morhange and Sarrebourg begin 14. (end on 20th).

16/08/1914: Landing of the original British Expeditionary 16. Force (4 Divisions and 1 Cavalry Division) in France completed.

17/08/1914: Russia invades East Prussia. Battle of the Tser and Jadar (Serbia) begins (ends 21st).

19/08/1014: Battle of Gawaiten-Gumbinnen (E. Prussia), (19th/20th).

22/08/1914: 27,000 French soldiers are killed on this single day in an offensive thrust to the east of Paris, towards the German borders.

23/08/1914: The BEF started to retreat from Mons. Austria-Hungary launches an invasion of Russian Poland. Japan declares war on Germany and attacks the German colony of Tsingtau in China.

 

How Canada‘s Offer Was Made, Timeline, In The First World War (FWW), Aug. 1914.

Correspondence By Cable Between the Governor General and The Secretary of State For The Colonies, From August 1st To August 15th, 1914.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 1, 1914.

In view of the impending danger of war involving the Empire my Advisers are anxiously considering the most effective means of rendering every possible aid and they will welcome any suggestions and advice which Imperial Naval and Military authorities may deem it expedient to offer. They are confident that- a considerable force would be available for service abroad. A question has been mooted respecting the status of any Canadian force serving abroad as under section sixty-nine of Canadian Militia Act the active militia can only be placed on active service beyond Canada for the defence thereof. It has been suggested that regiments might enlist as Imperial troops for stated period,

Canadian Government undertaking to make all necessary financial provision for their equipment, pay and maintenance. This proposal has not yet been maturely considered here and my advisers would be glad to have views of Imperial Government thereon. ARTHUR.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 1, 1914.

My Advisers while expressing their most earnest hope that peaceful solution of existing international difficulties may be achieved and their strong desire to co-operate in every possible way for that purpose wish me to convey to His Majesty’s Government the firm assurance that if unhappily war should ensue the Canadian people will be united in a common resolve to put forth every effort to make every sacrifice necessary to ensure the integrity and maintain the honour of our Empire. ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of Stale for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 2, 1914.

With reference to your telegram 1st August, His Majesty’s Government gratefully welcome the assurance of your Government that in the present crisis– they may rely on wholehearted co-operation of the people of Canada. HARCOURT.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 3, 1914.

With reference to your cypher telegram 2nd August, please inform your Ministers that their patriotic readiness to render every aid is deeply appreciated by His Majesty’s Government, but they would prefer postponing detailed observations on the suggestion put forward, pending further developments. As soon as a situation appears to call for further measures I will telegraph you again. HARCOURT.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 4, 1914.

Please communicate to your Ministers following message from His Majesty the King and publish:

I desire to express to my people of the Overseas Dominions with what appreciation and pride I have received the messages from their respective Governments during the last few days. These spontaneous assurances of their fullest support recalled to me the generous self-sacrificing help given by them in the past to the Mother Country. I shall be strengthened in the discharge of the great responsibilities which rest upon me by the confident belief that in this time of trial my Empire will stand united, calm, resolute, trusting in God. GEORGE R.I., HARCOURT.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 4, 1914.

Following for the King: In the name of the Dominion of Canada I humbly thank Your Majesty for your gracious message of approval. Canada stands united from the Pacific to the Atlantic in her determination to uphold the honour and tradition of our Empire.” ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 4, 1914.

Though there seems to be no immediate necessity for any request on our part for an expeditionary force from Canada, I think, in view of their generous offer, your Ministers would be wise to take all legislative and other steps by which they would be enabled without delay to provide such a force in case it should be required later. HARCOURT.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 5, 1914.

My Government being desirous of putting beyond doubt status of Canadian volunteers, request that His Majesty may be pleased to issue an order bringing these volunteers under Sections 175 and 176 of the Army Act. ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 6, 1914.

With reference to my telegram of August 4th, His Majesty’s Government gratefully accept offer of your Ministers to send expeditionary force to this country, and would be glad if it could be despatched as soon as possible. Suggested composition follows. HARCOURT.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 6, 1914.

My Advisers request me to inform you that the people of Canada through their Government desire to offer one million bags of flour of ninety-eight pounds each as a gift to the people of the United Kingdom to be placed at the disposal of His Majesty’s Government and to be used for such purposes as they may deem expedient. ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 7, 1914.

On behalf of the people of the United Kingdom, His Majesty’s Government accept with deep gratitude the splendid and welcome gift of flour from Canada which will be of the greatest use for the steadying of prices and relief of distress in this country. We can never forget the generosity and promptitude of this gift and the patriotism from which it springs. HARCOURT.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 7, 1914.

My telegram of 6th August Army Council consider one division would be suitable composition of expeditionary force. HARCOURT.

From Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 8, 1914.

Canadian Government desire to know what action His Majesty’s Government desire Canadian authorities to take regarding Army Reservists in Canada, of which there are several thousand in Canada, registered at Imperial Pension Office, Ottawa. Are they to be sent home at once? I understand officer paying Imperial Pensioners and Reservists here is in position to provide transport for these men and funds if necessary. ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 8, 1914.

Referring to my telegram 6th August Army Council state that a certain proportion of army troops will be required in addition to force mentioned. You will be furnished later on with suggested numbers. HARCOURT.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 8, 1914.

Canadian Government wish to place the two submarine boats now at Esquimalt at disposal of the Admiralty for general service. Please inform Admiralty. ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 9, 1914.

Following from Admiralty in reply to your telegram of yesterday’s date. Offer of submarine boats gratefully accepted by Admiralty. HARCOURT.

From the Governor General to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

OTTAWA, August 9, 1914.

No order having been received with reference to return of Army Reservists, would War Office allow them to enlist in Canadian Expeditionary Force which they are very anxious to do?ARTHUR.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 9, 1914.

With reference to your telegram of August 7th His Majesty is graciously pleased to order that the troops offered by Canada shall be raised by Your Royal Highness for service as expeditionary forces. It is suggested that terms of attestation should be as follows:

(a) For a term of one year unless war lasts longer than one year, in which case they will be retained until war over. If employed with hospitals, depots of mounted units, and as clerks, etcetera, they may be retained after termination of hostilities until services can be dispensed with but such retention shall in no case exceed six months.

(b) To be attached to any arm of service should it be required of them. Men should be attested by magistrate. HARCOURT.

From the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the Governor General.

LONDON, August 12, 1914.

Your telegrams 8th August and 9th August. Army Council would be glad if all Army Reservists could be sent home by first opportunity. If transport cannot be arranged at once they should return with Canadian Expeditionary Force. HARCOURT.

 

 

C. 2028:

Certified copy of a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Excellency the Deputy Governor General on the 2nd August, 1914.

The Committee of the Privy Council, on the recommendation of the Eight Honourable the Prime Minister, advise that as His Royal Highness the Governor General has received official notice that His Majesty’s Government has called out the Royal Naval Reserves, due notice thereof be published in an extra of The Canada Gazette in the form hereto attached.

(Sgd.) RODOLPHE BOUDEEAU, Clerk of the Privy Council.

 

ROYAL NAVAL RESERVES CALLED OUT.

Public Notice is hereby given that His Royal Highness the Governor General has received a telegraphic despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies announcing that His Majesty the King has by Royal Proclamation called out the Royal Naval Reserves. Attention is directed to the fact that by this proclamation men serving abroad, whether on shore or in merchant vessels, are required to report themselves to first British Naval, Consular or Colonial Officer they meet, or failing that, to the nearest Registrar on arrival in the United Kingdom. Of which all persons concerned are required to take notice and to govern themselves accordingly.

By Command, R. L. BORDEN, Secretary of State for External Affairs. Ottawa, 2nd August, 1914.

 

P.C. 2040:

CERTIFIED copy of a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Royal Highness the Governor General on the 5th August, 1914.

The Committee of the Privy Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Militia and Defence, advise, with regard to the existing situation, that the Minister of Militia and Defence be permitted to call out units of the Active (non-permanent) Militia, as circumstances may demand, to complete the unexpired portion of the thirty (30) days’ training authorized by section 52 of the Militia Act.

(Signed) RODOLPHE BOUDREAU, Clerk of the Privy Council.

 

 

P.C. 2042:

Certified copy of a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Royal Highness the Governor General on the 4th August, 1914.

The Committee of the Privy Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Militia and Defence, advise that the attached draft General Order, dated 4th August, 1914, authorizing an increase in the strength of Privates of the Royal Canadian Regiment from 596 to 922 be approved. A statement of the expenditure involved is attached hereto.

(Signed) RODOLPHE BOUDREAU, Clerk of the Privy Council.

 

 

P.C. 2047:

CERTIFIED copy of a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Royal Highness the Governor General on the 4th August, 1914.

The Committee of the Privy Council have had before them a joint report, dated 4th August, 1914, from the Minister of the Naval Service and the Minister of Customs, stating that section 43 of the Naval Service Act, chapter 43 of the Statutes of 1910, provides that:-

” The Governor in Council may from time to time transfer to or from the Naval Service any vessel belonging to His Majesty.”

The Committee, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Naval Service and the Minister of Customs, advise that the C.G.S. ‘Canada’ and the C.G.S.

‘Margaret’ be transferred to the Naval Service.

(Sgd.) RODOLPHE BOUDREAU, Clerk of the Privy Council.

 

 

P.C. 2049:

CERTIFIED copy of a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Royal Highness the Governor General on the 4th August, 1914.

The Committee of the Privy Council have had before them a Report, dated 4th August, 1914, from the Minister of the Naval Service, submitting that section 23 of the Naval Service Act, chapter 43 of the Statutes of 1910 provides that:- 23. In case of an emergency the Governor in Council may place at the disposal of His Majesty, for general service in the Royal Navy, the Naval Service or any part thereof, any ships or vessels of the Naval Service, and the officers and seamen serving in such ship or vessels, or any officers or seamen belonging to the Naval Service.

An emergency having arisen, the Minister recommends that H.M.C.S. ‘Niobe’ and H.M.C.S. ‘ Rainbow,’ together with the officers and seamen serving in such vessels, be placed at the disposal of His Majesty for general service in the Royal Navy.

The Committee concur in the foregoing recommendation and submit the same for approval.

(Sgd.) RODOLPHE BOUDREAU, Cleric of the Privy Council.

 

Extract from the Canada Gazette of Saturday, August, 1914.

GENERAL ORDERS. 1914.

Headquarters Ottawa, 4th August, 1914.

STABLISHMENTS, 1914-15.

Active Militia including Permanent Force.

With reference to General Order 87, 1914, the following amendment is authorized:—

ROYAL CANADIAN REG.

Page 12, in column headed Regimental Establishment opposite total rank and file for “596” read “922.” By command, (Signed) VICTOR A. S. WILLIAMS,Colonel, Adjutant-General.

 

The Quebec Chronicle, Wed. Aug. 5, 1914.

MONTREAL GLAD NOW ENGLAND HAS TAKEN PLUNGE.

Accepted announcement as the inevitable-great enthusiasm prevails.

Montreal. Aug. 4- The news of the declaration of war was received by the citizens of Montreal pretty much as they might have received word of the result of an election except that in this case there was no surprise and they were practically unanimous in accepting it as the inevitable thing. After two or three days of anxious waiting the people seemed almost relieved to learn that at last Britannia had taken the plunge. Extra editions bougar up in different sections of the city, and many thousands of people were in the streets and in front of the bulletin boards until after midnight. Cheering and flag-waving were indulged in by thousands of enthusiastic young men and there was a repetition of the streets or four nights in support of the streets demonstrations, however, was more earnest than those preceding it.

Throughout the city there is unanimity in the belief that Britannia’s quarrel is a just-one, and the people generally are in sympathy with the patriotic fervour shown this week by the various military organizations of volunteers in this city, as was made plain tonight by the crowds in the street cheering and singing “God Save the King,” “Rule Britannia,” And “Le Marseillaise,” and declaring their willingness to go to wars.

Even the older people, while seeming to realize the serious import of the news, spoke of war as the only way out of the present situation.

 

 

P.C. 2068:

AT THE GOVERNMENT HOUSE AT OTTAWA.

Thursday, the 6th day of August, 1914.

PRESENT: HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE GOVERNOR GENERAL IN COUNCIL.

Whereas in view of the state of war existing between the United Kingdom and the Dominions, Colonies and Dependencies of the Empire, on the one side, and Germany, on the other side; and in view of the fact that thereby the Dominion of Canada is liable to invasion and other assaults of a hostile nature, such an emergency has arisen as calls for the placing of the Militia on “active service.”

Therefore His Royal Highness the Governor General in Council, under the authority of Section Sixty-nine of the Militia Act, is hereby pleased to order that such corps or parts of the Militia as may from time to time, with the approval of the Governor General, in Council, be named or designated in General Orders published in the Canada Gazette, be placed on Active service in Canada.

(Sgd.) RODOLPHE BOUDREAU, Clerk of the Privy Council.

 

© Spañard

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