Canada’s “Permanent Force” Annual Militia Report, Year Ending Mar. 31st, 1912.

  • To His Royal Highness, Field Marshal, Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, E.G., K.T., K.P., &c., &c., d-c, Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of Canada.

 

  • Sir, I have the honour to lay before Your Royal Highness the annual report of the Militia Council for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1912.
  • I have the honour to be, Sir, Your Royal Highness’s most obedient Servant, SAM HUGHES, Minister of Militia and Defence. November 21, 1912.

 

Preparatory and Refresher Courses.

  1. A “Preparatory Course” is held at the Royal Military College, annually, from January to June, for the benefit of candidates from the Permanent Force preparing themselves for the entrance examination to the Staff College. Four officers were attending the course at the end of the fiscal year.
  2. In conjunction with the above, there is a “Refresher Course” of three months (January—March) for the military education of officers of the Permanent Force, or selected officers of the Active Militia. Five officers attended this course during the spring of 1912.

Staff Tour.

  1. A Staff Tour was held at Kentville in the autumn for the Permanent Force officers of the Halifax Garrison, and smaller regimental exercises were held in the other divisional areas. It is hoped that in future it will be possible to hold at least one staff tour in each divisional area each year.

War Games.

  1. War games were carried out in the various divisional areas under the direction of the General Staff Officers. These exercises are not of an advanced nature; they are intended to provide elementary instruction in tactics for officers both of the Permanent Force and of the Active Militia.

 

Royal Canadian Regiment, attached for duty. Petawawa camp, Aug. 1911. Col. Septimus Denison C.M.G. in centre

Royal Canadian Regiment, attached for duty. Petawawa camp, Aug. 1911. Col. Septimus Denison C.M.G. in centre

 

 

EXAMINATIONS.

Promotion Examinations.

  1. The examination of officers of the Permanent Force in subject “c” (practical), previously conducted under arrangements made from Militia Headquarters, was handed over to the officers commanding divisions and districts, and will be held by them from time to time as required.
  2. The semi-annual written examinations were held in May and December. Sixty-five candidates, officers of the Permanent Force, presented themselves for examination in one or more subjects or subheads. The papers for these examinations continue to be set by the War Office, and they are looked over and marked in the same way as those of officers of the regular army.

Tactical Fitness.

  1. An examination in the practical portion. Part II, was held at Petawawa in August, 1911. Two officers of the Permanent Force were examined and qualified.

Lieutenant-Colonels, Active Militia.

  1. The examination of lieutenant-colonels of the Active Militia before promotion to the rank of colonel is similar to that for majors of the Permanent Force, but modified in accordance with the regulations. The papers are looked over in Canada. Two officers underwent this examination, and one succeeded in passing.

Literary Examination.

  1. Five candidates presented themselves for the Literary Examination for appointment to the Permanent Force, held in May, 1911, of whom none passed.

ORGANIZATION. 

  1. The establishment of a Permanent Army Service Corps School of Instruction was authorized in April, 1911, the headquarters of the school being at Halifax, N.S., with branch schools at Quebec, Kingston and Toronto. Provision was made for an officer of the Permanent Army Service Corps to be appointed Commandant and for the necessary instructional staff. A Veterinary School of instruction has, also, been authorized.

 

PERMANENT STAFF AND FORCE.

  1. During the year 40 officers were appointed to the several branches of the Permanent Staff and Force, as follows:—
  • Permanent Staff……………………………………..4.
  • Cavalry………………………………………………..6.
  • Royal Canadian Artillery…………………………….4.
  • Royal Canadian Engineers………………………….5.
  • Royal Canadian Regiment…………………………10.
  • Permanent Army Medical Corps……………………3.
  • Canadian Ordnance Corps………………………….4.
  • Canadian Permanent Army Service Corps………..2.
  • Canadian Permanent Army Veterinary Corps…….1.
  • Corps of Military Staff Clerks……………………….1.
  • Grand Total……..……………………………………40.

 

  1. The following table shows the strength of the Permanent Force by stations on 31st March. 1912, including Active Militia officers attached for duty, and certain civilians employed in lieu of soldiers.
Strength of Permanent Force,  Station, March 31st, 1912.

Strength of Permanent Force, Station, March 31st, 1912.

 

  1. The following table shows the strength by Corps of the Permanent Force on 31st March, 1912, including Active Militia officers attached for duty, and certain civilians employed in lieu of soldiers.
Permanent Force Strength Maintained March 31st 1912.

Permanent Force Strength Maintained March 31st 1912.

 

  1. The following table shows the changes in strength of the Permanent Force from 1st April, 1911. to 31st March, 1913:—
Permanent Force Table Showing Changes in Strength from Apr. 1st 1911 to Mar. 31st 1912.

Permanent Force Table Showing Changes in Strength from Apr. 1st 1911 to Mar. 31st 1912.

 

 

PERMANENT STAFF.

  1. The following are the changes in personnel of the Permanent Staff at Militia Headquarters and in the various Divisional Commands and Districts:—

 

 Headquarters’ Staff:—

  • Colonel W.G. Gwatkin was appointed General Staff Officer for Mobilization.
  • Colonel Henry Smith was appointed Judge Advocate General from the Branch of the Adjutant General.
  • Colonel G.C. Jones (Lieut.-Col., P.A.M.C), whose appointment expired, was re-appointed Director General of Medical Services.
  • Lieut.-Col. C.E. English, R.C.A., vacated the appointment of Inspector of Garrison Artillery.
  • Lieut.-Col. H.E. Burstall, E.C.A., was appointed Inspector of Horse, Field and Heavy Artillery, from Inspector of Horse and Field Artillery.
  • Lieut.-Col. W.R. Ward, C.A.P.C., whose appointment expired, was reappointed Assistant Paymaster General.
  • Lieut.-Col. H. C. Thacker, R.C.A., vacated the appointment of Director of Artillery.
  • Lieut.-Col. H. C. Thacker, R.C.A., was appointed Inspector of Coast Defence Artillery.
  • Charles Greville-Harston, Esq.. was appointed Chief Inspector of Arms and Ammunition, with the rank of Lieut.-Colonel.
  • Major W. B. Anderson, K.C.E., was appointed Director of Military Training, vice Major (Temporary Lieut.-Col.) P.E. Thacker, L.S.H. (R.C.).
  • Captain A. H. Borden, R.C.R.. was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant General.
  • Captain A. H. Borden, R.C.R.. vacated the appointment of Deputy Assistant Adjutant General.
  • Captain L.G. VanTuyl. R.C.E., vacated the appointment of Staff Lieut.
  • Lieut., and Brevet Captain C. B. Costin. R.C.R., was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant General, rice Captain A. H. Borden, R.C.R.

Divisional Staff:—

Lieut.-Colonel J. Galloway was retired retaining rank.

1st Division:—

  • Colonel W.E. Hodgins was appointed Officer Commanding from District Officer Commanding Military District No. 1.
  • Lieut.-Col. C.W. Belton, P.A.M.C, was appointed Administrative Medical Officer, from A.M.O.. Military District No. 1.
  • Major A. H. Macdonell, D.S.O., R.C.R., was appointed Assistant Adjutant General from Chief Staff Officer, Western Ontario Command.
  • Major L.W. Shannon was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General from District Staff Adjutant, Military District No. 1.
  • Captain G. C. W. Gordon-Hall (Yorkshire Light Infantry), Canadian Militia,
  • was appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade.

2nd, Division:—

  • Colonel (Temporary Brigadier General) W. H. Cotton was appointed Officer Commanding from Officer Commanding Western Ontario Command.
  • Colonel T. D. R. Hemming was appointed Assistant Adjutant General in charge of Administration, from District Officer Commanding Military District No. 3.
  • Lieut. –Col. J. A. Grant, P.A.M.C., was appointed Administrative Medical Officer from Principal Medical Officer, Western Ontario Command.
  • Lieut.-Col. J. Galloway vacated the appointment of Deputy Assistant Adjutant General.
  • Lieut.-Col. J.T. Fotheringham vacated the appointment of Administrative Medical Officer.
  • Major L.T. Philips (King’s Royal Rifle Corps), Canadian Militia, was appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade.
  • Major C.C. Bennett was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, from District Staff Adjutant, Military District No. 11.

3rd, Division:—

  • Colonel T. Benson was appointed Officer Commanding from Officer Commanding Eastern Ontario Command.
  • Colonel G.H. Ogilvie was appointed Assistant Adjutant General in charge of Administration, from District Staff Adjutant, Military District No. 12.
  • Lieut. –Col. H.R. Duff, P.A.M.C, was appointed Administrative Medical Officer, from Principal Medical Officer, Eastern Ontario Command.
  • Lieut.-Colonel J. E. Chinic, R.C.R., vacated the appointment of Chief Staff Officer.
  • Lieut.-Col. D.D. Young, R.C R., vacated the appointment of Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General.
  • Lieut.-Col. A.T. Shillington, A.M.C., vacated the appointment of Administrative Medical Officer.
  • Major G. V. Horden (King’s Royal Rifle Corps), Canadian Militia, was appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade.
  • Captain E.E. Clarke was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, from District Staff Adjutant, Military District No.1.

4th, Division:—

  • Colonel A. Roy, M.V.O., A.D.C., was appointed Officer Commanding from Officer Commanding Quebec Command.
  • Colonel J. C. MacDougall, R.C.R., was appointed Assistant Adjutant General in charge of Administration, from Chief Staff Officer, Maritime Provinces Command.
  • Lieut.-Col. J.A. Fages was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General.
  • Lieut.-Col. C. E. English (Royal Artillery), was appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade.
  • Lieut.-Col. J.W. Bridges, P.A.M.C, was appointed Administrative Medical Officer, from Principal Medical Officer, Quebec Command.

5th, Division:—

  • Colonel O.C.C, Pelletier was appointed Officer Commanding, from Officer Commanding Military District No. 7.
  • Lieut.-Col. K. Cameron, A.M.C., vacated the appointment of Administrative Medical Officer.
  • Lieut.-Col. C.F. Winter was appointed Assistant Adjutant General in charge of Administration, from Deputy Assistant Adjutant General, Quebec Command.
  • Major W. Robertson (Royal Engineers), Canadian Militia, was appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade.
  • Major J.D. Brousseau, P.A.M.C., was appointed Administrative Medical Officer, from Administrative Medical Officer, Military District No.7.
  • Captain E.W. Pope, R.C.R., was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, from District Staff Adjutant, Military District No.7.

6th Division:—

  • Colonel (Temporary Brigadier General) C. W. Drury, C.B., A.D.C., was appointed Officer Commanding, from Officer Commanding Maritime Provinces Command.
  • Colonel W. M. Humphrey was appointed Assistant Adjutant General in charge of Administration, from District Officer Commanding Military District No. 8.
  • Lieut.-Colonel G. LaF. Foster, P.A.M.C. was appointed Administrative Medical Officer, from Principal Medical Officer, Maritime Provinces Command.
  • Captain A. H. H. Powell, R.C.D., was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, from Deputy Assistant Adjutant General, Maritime Provinces Command.
  • Captain R. J. F. Hayter (Cheshire Regiment), Canadian Militia, was appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade.

Military District No. 10:—

  • Major F.L. Vaux, P.A.M.C, was appointed Senior Medical Officer, from

Principal Medical Officer.

Military District No. 11:—

  • Major E.C. Hart, P.A.M.C, was appointed Senior Medical Officer, from Principal Medical Officer.
  • Captain F. W. J. Moore, R. of O., was appointed District Staff Adjutant, rice Captain C.C. Bennett, transferred.

Halifax Fortress:—

Major W. B. Anderson, R.C.E., was appointed General Staff Officer, 3rd Grade, from Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General, Maritime Provinces Command. Captain W. W. P. Gibson, R.C.R., was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General.

 

COMMISSIONS.

  1. Thirty-eight warrants were issued to specially qualified non-commissioned officers of the Permanent Force and Active Militia.

 

Colonel Dennison and sergeants of the Royal Canadian Regiment Oct., 1911, Halifax N.S.''

Colonel Dennison and sergeants of the Royal Canadian Regiment Oct., 1911, Halifax N.S.”

 

 

PERMANENT FORCE.

  1. There was an increase of $101,402.06 in the cost of the Force, compared with the preceding year, the cost for 1911-12 being $1,946,633.73 and for 1910-11, $1,845,231.67. This was largely due to an increase in the numerical strength of the Force, which in 1910-11 was:—
  • At beginning of year….2,854, all ranks.
  • At close of year……… 3,079…….” “.

and for 1911-12:—”

  • At beginning of year….3,079..……” “.
  • At close of year……….3,118……..” “.
  1. For cost of pay and maintenance by Corps and at the various stations, see accompanying statements, pages 42-49.

 

Permanent Force Expenditures By Station On Pay allowances And Supplies, Mar. 31st 1912. 4.

Permanent Force Expenditures By Station On Pay allowances And Supplies, Mar. 31st 1912. 4.

 

Permanent Force Expenditures By Station On Pay allowances Of Officers and W.O's, Mar. 31st 1912.

Permanent Force Expenditures By Station On Pay allowances Of Officers and W.O’s, Mar. 31st 1912.

 

Permanent Force Expenditure of Pay And Allowances, ended Mar. 31st, 1912.

Permanent Force Expenditure of Pay And Allowances, ended Mar. 31st, 1912.

 

Permanent Force Stations, Expenditures on account of pay and allowances of NCO's and Men, Ending Mar. 31st 1912.

Permanent Force Stations, Expenditures on account of pay and allowances of NCO’s and Men, Ending Mar. 31st 1912.

 

Permanent Force Expenditure at each Station on account  of Pay and Allowances of NCO's, Men Ending Mar. 31st, 1912 Part II.

Permanent Force Expenditure at each Station on account of Pay and Allowances of NCO’s, Men Ending Mar. 31st, 1912 Part II.

 

Permanent Force Expenditures on account Of Pay and Allowances of NCO's and Men, Mar. 31st, 1912, by Corps. 9.

Permanent Force Expenditures on account Of Pay and Allowances of NCO’s and Men, Mar. 31st, 1912, by Corps.

 

Permanent Force, Expenditures Of Corps, Pay and Allowances of NCO's and Men,  March 31st, 1912. 10.

Permanent Force, Expenditures Of Corps, Pay and Allowances of NCO’s and Men, March 31st, 1912. 10.

 

 

APPENDIX ‘A’.

Ottawa, March 31, 1913.

  • From the Director-General, Medical Services. Canadian Militia.
  • To the Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia.

Sir, I have the honour to submit my report upon the Medical Services for the year ending March 31, 1912:

GENERAL ORGANIZATION.

  1. The administration of the Divisions and Districts is now carried on by two officers; one is an officer of the Permanent Army Medical Corps, and the other is an officer detailed as his staff officer from the Army Medical Corps. The latter receives no pay and, if he does not happen to go to camp, is in receipt; of no financial return for the work he is called upon to do. This seems hardly just.

PERMANENT ARMY MEDICAL CORPS.

  1. The Permanent Army Medical Corps has many functions to perform, and its present limited establishment cannot begin to be able to meet the demands made.
  2. Its first function is the administration of the Medical Services of the Militia, both Active and Permanent. This demands an office and clerical stag in each Division and District. It also supplies the personnel for the office of the Director General at Headquarters.
  3. Its second function is the care of the sick of the Permanent Force, the Active Militia (cases sent from Camps of Training), the Canadian Naval Service and the Cadets at the Royal Military College. To perform this, there are six dieted hospitals and two non-dieted ones. Two of these hospitals are very large buildings, rather old-fashioned and difficult to care for and administer.
  4. Its third function in the receiving, distributing and repairing of all Medical Stores. There are Medical Stores in each Division and District and a Central Medical Stores at Ottawa. In a year’s time each Divisional Stores will carry the complete medical equipment for that Division, valuable stores amounting to over $21,000.00.
  5. Its fourth function is to supervise the sanitation of camps and barracks. It has, therefore, to provide for the personnel of the Central Laboratory of Military Hygiene and other local and temporary laboratories.
  6. Its fifth function is instructional; it must provide schools and instructors for the Active Militia.
  7. Its sixth function is to provide medical personnel at certain camps, such as Petawawa, MacNab’s Island and York Redoubt, and also at camps for which no Army Medical Corps’ personnel is available.
  8. Its seventh function is to look after its own administration, being divided up into so many small detachments increases this work very materially. There is almost as much clerical work connected with a detachment of five men as that which numbers 100 or more.
  9. To perform these functions we have a total authorized establishment of 101 of all ranks. The work cannot be done under these conditions.

 

HEALTH OF THE PERMANENT FORCE.

  1. The decline in the incidence of sickness, remarked upon in previous reports, is continued for the period now dealt with. The following table depicts, in figurative form, the improvement in the health of the officers and men that has taken place:—

Ratio per 1,000 of strength.

  • Years…………Admissions.
  • 1906……………769.09.
  • 1907……………709.90.
  • 1908……………777.07.
  • 1909……………689.34.
  • 1910……………639.50.
  • 1911……………576.42.
  • 1912……………499.51.
  • Average ratio… 663. 69.

 

  1. The introduction of the system of treating the milder cases of sickness in barracks will, to some extent, explain the reduction in the admission rate shown above, together with the improved sanitary conditions under which soldiers live.
  2. This marked diminution in the numbers admitted cannot but prove a valuable asset to the Permanent Force by adding to its efficiency and curtailing expenditure in the maintenance of hospital beds. The interest shown by both officers and men in sanitary matters, and the facilities afforded by the Central Military Laboratory of Hygiene for the analysis of water and pathological specimens has, without question, also been largely responsible for this low rate of sickness.
  3. The principal causes of sickness, in order of their importance, were:—

Diphtheria, 9: Enteric fever, 8 ; and only one admission for Tuberculosis. The improved admission rate for this last disease has been remarkable, the average for the past five years being seven. Admissions for Alcoholism remain in the same as for the last report, but a gratifying decrease in venereal diseases can be reported, —122 cases having been admitted, as against 154 for period 1911.

  1. Forty-two cases have been dealt with by operative treatment, thus effecting a reduction of wastage by returning men to duty that would, otherwise, be invalided and their services lost to the country.

 

Early morning start B Battery R.C.H.A.  1909.

Early morning start B Battery R.C.H.A. 1909.

APPENDIX ‘E’.

 INTERIM REPORT OF THE MILITIA COUNCIL FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA ON THE TRAINING OF THE MILITIA DURING THE SEASON OF 1911.

 

  • To His Royal Highness, Field Marshal. Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, E.G., K.T., K.P., &c., &c., &c., Governor- General and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of Canada.
  • Sir,—I have the honour to lay before Your Royal Highness an Interim Report on the training; of the Militia of the Dominion of Canada, during the season of 1911; to be embodied at a later date in the Report of the Militia Council for the year ending March 31, 1912.

I have the honour to be, sir, Your Royal Highness’s most obedient servant, SAM HUGHES, Minister of Militia and Defence.

February 7, 1912.

  1. On the first occasion for four years the four arms of the Permanent Force were concentrated at Petawawa for training. The necessity for such training being carried out annually, and the various arms being given an opportunity of acting in co-operation, was apparent. The training of the Permanent Force at a central camp annually is essential to its efficiency, and if not so trained its duties; in relation to the Active Militia as regards instruction cannot be properly carried out.

 

B. Battery R.C.H.A. at Trent 1909.

B. Battery R.C.H.A. at Trent 1909.

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTOR-GENERAL 1911.

  • From—The Inspector-General, Canadian Militia.
  • To— The Secretary, Militia Council.

Ottawa, January 27. 1912.

 

PERMANENT UNITS.

  1. In the maintenance of the Permanent Units up to their respective establishments, difficulty is found, arising mainly from the abundance of employment that exists in all walks of life.
  2. But few Canadian born enlist, the majority of recruits obtained being immigrants from Great Britain, most of whom have had previous experience, and are, therefore, a desirable type.
  3. At present the Force is some 372 officers and men under strength, a condition which in such garrisons as Halifax, Quebec, and Esquimalt, where the duties of preserving and maintaining military properties are greatest, seriously affects efficiency.
  4. The efficiency of most of the combatant units has been greatly improved by the month’s experience of combined training at Petawawa in August Vast, particularly “Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians),” and No. 2 Company, Royal Canadian Engineers, which, for the first time, had the opportunity of taking part in such work.
  5. The “Royal Canadian Dragoons” may be considered as in good order; the practice of “hogging” the horses’ manes in this unit cannot, however, be commended; it is neither ornamental nor useful.
  6. The recent field training given to Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians) at Petawawa, was of great advantage, but its usefulness as an instructional corps is lost to a great degree, through delay in the organization of the second squadron, and for the same reason a number of officers are idle.
  7. The ”Royal Canadian Artillery”, though under-manned, maintains a high standard of efficiency.
  8. The “Royal Canadian Engineers” are fulfilling their duties satisfactorily, in so far as fortress requirements and works and repairs are concerned, but I cannot think their association with similar units of the Active Militia, from an instructional point of view, is as close as it should be.
  9. The headquarter companies of “The Royal Canadian Regiment” are well in hand and efficient, but weaknesses appear in the administration of the outlying companies which require attention.
  10. A change of stations and personnel, at regular intervals, might produce good results.
  11. The musketry of the Permanent Force has been carried out in accordance with the syllabus laid down in Musketry Regulations, 1903, which is of a most practical character, embodying preliminary training, grouping, bulls-eye shooting, and field practices.
  12. Owing to the many demands on the Permanent Force during the summer months, in connection with the training of the Active Militia, very little time is left for rifle practice, but, with a few exceptions, the musketry has been as well carried out as circumstances permitted. The interest displayed by the young officer, however, does not always appear as keen as it should be.
  13. In the matter of gun practice of the Artillery, similar conditions and remarks obtain as in the preceding paragraph, except as contained in the last sentence.
  14. The condition of the various permanent units of the departmental corps varies.
  15. Those of the Medical and Pay Corps appear well administered, supervised, and provided both in personnel and materiel.
  16. In the Ordnance, weaknesses are apparent, arising principally from the fusion with the old Civilian Stores Branch, and consequent introduction of many individuals who had not been educated up to the higher qualifications necessary to the administration of so technical a department, and are now possibly too advanced in years to apply themselves to the conditions arising from reorganization under military regulations. A handicap is also placed upon the Corps through want of proper storehouse and fittings, consequently congestion and untidiness prevail at a number of the depots, which must interfere with the heavy duties entailed at certain periods annually.
  17. Among the personnel are many in all ranks possessed of capability and zeal; others again whose duties are only performed perfunctorily, while owing to the want of barracks or quarters near-by the several stores and offices, the officers and men are obliged to live in private houses, scattered about, and lose the advantages of military association and discipline, so essential to the soldier, besides being difficult to supervise or assemble in case of emergency.
  18. The Army Service Corps has not yet acquired the efficiency necessary to its importance, because of its hurried organization and feverish anxiety to at once undertake duties in which a thorough grounding had not been obtained, with the result that its personnel contains a number who fail to comply with many of the essentials of the Corps.
  19. This Department of the Permanent Service, involving so many important factors in the general efficiency of a military force, should be sound in its organization, and fully capable of educating similar units of the Active Militia, and others whose duties bring them in contact.
  • I have the honour to be, sir. Your obedient servant. W. D. OTTER, Colonel, (Temporary Major-General), Inspector-General.

 
Spañard
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