Canada’s “Permanent Force” Annual Militia Report, Year Ending Mar. 31st, 1913.

  • To His Royal Highness Field Marshal Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connauqht and Strathearn, K.G.,K.T., K.P., &c., &c., &c., Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of Canada.
  • Sir, I have the honour to lay before Your Royal Highness the annual report of the Militia Council for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1913.
  • I have the honour to be, Sir, Your Royal Highness’ most obedient servant, SAM HUGHES, Minister of Militia and Defence. November 1, 1913.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MILITIA COUNCIL.

Year Ending: March 3 1st, 1913.

 

PREPARATORY AND REFRESHER COURSES.

  1. Four officers who attended the Preparatory Course at the Royal Military College wrote on the Staff College Entrance Examination in May, 1913. Three were successful and are now attending the Staff College, viz.:—
  • Captain F. S. Morrison, Royal Canadian Dragoons.
  • Captain J. H. MacBrien, Royal Canadian Dragoons.
  • Captain A. H. Borden, Royal Canadian Regiment.
  1. One officer, Captain E. K. Eaton, Royal Canadian Regiment, was attending the Preparatory Course at the end of the fiscal year, in anticipation of writing at the next Staff College Entrance Examination.
  2. Four officers attended and completed the Refresher Course at the Royal Military College during the spring of 1913:—
  • Major L. W. Shannon, Permanent Staff.
  • Major E. F. Mackie,. D. S. 0., Lord Strathcona’s Horse, (R. C).
  • Major L. LeDuc, Royal Canadian Regiment.
  • Major F. L. Vaux, Permanent Army Medical Corps.
Royal Regiment of Canada, 1911 Petawawa Camp, Eric Costin and wireless Telegraph apparatus. Transmitting.

Royal Regiment of Canada, 1911 Petawawa Camp, Eric Costin and wireless Telegraph apparatus. Transmitting.

ARTILLERY STAFF COURSE.

  1. Only one officer, Lieutenant H. M. Reynolds, 1st Field Company, Canadian Engineers, attended the Artillery Staff Course, which he successfully completed in November, 1912.
  2. Four officers of the Permanent Force and one officer of the Non-permanent Militia were attending the course which commenced in January and will terminate in October, 1913.

EXAMINATIONS.

  1. The examination of officers of the Permanent Force in the practical subjects required for promotion, was conducted under Divisional Commanders, as required.
  2. The semi-annual written examinations were held in May and December, 1912.
  3. Forty-seven candidates, officers of the Permanent Staff and of the Permanent Force, presented themselves for examination in one or more subjects or sub-heads.
  4. The papers were set and marked by the War Office, like those of officers of the Regular Army.

Tactical Fitness:—

  1. Four officers of the Permanent Force attended the practical portion of the examination in September, 1912, at Petawawa, and three were successful, viz.:
  • Major J. Houliston, Royal Canadian Engineers.
  • Major A. C. Caldwell, Royal Canadian Engineers.
  • Major W. B. Anderson, Royal Canadian Engineers.

Promotion to rank of Colonel:—

  1. One officer, Lieut.-colonel F. W. Hill, 44th Regiment, passed the examination held in September, 1912, at Petawawa, for promotion to the rank of colonel.

Literary Examination:—

  1. Seven candidates presented themselves for the literary examination, held in May, 1912, for appointment to commissions in the Permanent Force, but only one was successful.
Royal Canadian Regiment Signal Corps, 1890-1914, Halifax, N.S.'

Royal Canadian Regiment Signal Corps, 1890-1914, Halifax, N.S.’

PERMANENT STAFF AND PERMANENT FORCE.

  1. During the year 34 officers were appointed to the several branches of the Permanent Staff and the Permanent Force as follows:—
  • Permanent Staff……………………………………5.
  • Royal Canadian Dragoons……………………….1.
  • Royal Canadian Artillery…………………………..2.
  • Royal Canadian Engineers………………………..7.
  • Royal Canadian Engineers, Honorary Colonel….1.
  • Royal Canadian Regiment…………………………5.
  • Canadian Permanent Army Service Corps……….6.
  • Canadian Ordnance Corps…………………………3.
  • Canadian Army Pay Corps…………………………2.
  • Corps of Military Staff Clerks……………………….2.
  • Total…………………………………………………..34.
Strength of the Permanent Force, etc. on March 31st 1913. 1

Strength of the Permanent Force, etc. on March 31st 1913. 1

Permanent Staff and Force place of Birth on Jan 1st 1913. 2

Permanent Staff and Force place of Birth on Jan 1st 1913. 2

Army Reservists serving in the Permanent Force, Jan 1st, 1913. 3

Army Reservists serving in the Permanent Force, Jan 1st, 1913. 3

PERMANENT STAFF.

  1. The following are the changes in the personnel of the Permanent Staff at Militia Headquarters and in the various Divisions and Districts:—

Headquarters’ Staff:—

  • Major-General W.D. Otter, C.V.O., C.B., vacated the appointment of Inspector-General and was retired, retaining rank.
  • Major-General D.A. Macdonald, C.M.G., I.S.O., whose appointment expired, was re-appointed Quartermaster-General.
  • Major-General W.H. Cotton was appointed Inspector-General. Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) F.L. Lessard, C.B., vacated the appointment of Adjutant-General and was granted the rank of Major-General on appointment as General Officer Commanding 2nd Division.
  • Colonel R.W. Rutherford vacated the appointment of Master-General of the Ordnance and was appointed Officer Commanding 6th Division.
  • Colonel T. Benson vacated the appointment of Officer Commanding 3rd Division, on appointment as Master-General of the Ordnance.
  • Colonel V.A.S. Williams, A.D.C., was appointed Adjutant-General.
  • Colonel J. L. Biggar, Canadian Permanent Army Service Corps, whose appointment expired, was re-appointed Director of Supply and Transport.
  • Lieut.-Col. R. J. Gwynne was detailed to perform the duties of Director of Cadet Services, and attached to the Branch of the Adjutant-General.
  • Lieut.-Col. E.W.B. Morrison was detailed to perform the duties of Director of Artillery, and attached to the Branch of the Master-General, of the Ordnance.
  • Lieut.-Col. G.S. Maunsell, whose appointment expired, was re-appointed Director-General of Engineer Services. This officer was also appointed Inspector of Engineers.
  • Lieut.-Col. H. M. Elliot was appointed Director of Artillery. This officer  subsequently vacated the post and was appointed A.A.G. in charge of Administration, 2nd Division.
  • Lieut.-Colonel C. M. Nelles, Royal Canadian Dragoons, was appointed Inspector of Cavalry.
  • Lieut.-Colonel C. F. Winter was appointed Military Secretary.
  • Major W. B. Anderson, Royal Canadian Engineers, whose appointment expired, was re-appointed Director of Military Training.
  • Captain E.E. Clarke was appointed Assistant Director of Supply and Transport •
  • Captain C.B. Costin, Royal Canadian Regiment, vacated the appointment of Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General.

 

Royal Canadian Regiment 1911, Petawawa.

Royal Canadian Regiment 1911, Petawawa.

1st Division:—

  • Major H.J. Lamb, Corps of Guides, resigned the appointment of Divisional Intelligence Officer.
  • Captain G.N. Weeks, Corps of Guides, was appointed Divisional Intelligence Officer (provisionally).

2nd Division:—

  • Major-General F.L. Lessard, C.B., was appointed General Officer Commanding, on vacating the appointment of Adjutant General.
  • Major J.H. Elmsley, Royal Canadian Dragoons, was appointed General Staff Officer (3rd grade).
  • Major and brevet Lieut.-Colonel H. M. Elliot (Royal Artillery), CM., was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General in charge of Administration.
  • Captain T.F.H. Dixon, Lord Strathcona’s Horse (R.C.), was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster-General.
  • Lieut.-Col. G. La F. Foster, Permanent Army Medical Corps, was appointed Assistant Director of Medical Services.

3rd Division:—

  • Colonel T.D.R. Hemming, Permanent Staff, was appointed Officer Commanding.
  • Major C. C. Bennett, Permanent Staff, was appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster-General.

4th Division:—

  • Colonel S.J.A. Denison, C.M.G., Royal Canadian Regiment, was appointed Officer Commanding.
  • Major L. Leduc, Royal Canadian Regiment, was appointed Assistant Adjutant- General in charge of Administration.

5th Division:—

  • Colonel O.C.C. Pelletier, Officer Commanding, was retired on pension.
  • Lieut.-Col. J. P. Landry, A.D.C., was appointed Officer Commanding, with the temporary rank of Colonel.
  • Major J. D. Brousseau, Permanent Army Medical Corps, vacated the appointment of Administrative Medical Officer.
  • Major J. T. Clarke, Permanent Army Medical Corps, was appointed Assistant

Director of Medical Services.

  • Major J. D. Doull, Royal Canadian Regiment, was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General in charge of Administration.

6th Division:—

  • Colonel R. W. Rutherford, Permanent Staff, was appointed Officer Commanding, vice Major-General C. W, Drury, C.B., deceased.
  • Lieut.-Col. J. A. Grant, Permanent Army Medical Corps, was appointed Assistant Director of Medical Services.
  • Lieut. A. R. McCleave, 63rd Regt., was appointed Intelligence Officer (provisionally), Halifax Fortress.

No. 10 Military District:—

  • Captain (temporary Major) W.T. Lawless, Permanent Staff, was appointed District Staff Adjutant.
  • Captain H.D. Smith, Canadian Army Veterinary Corps, was appointed Principal Veterinary Officer.
  • Major J.A. Hesketh, Corps of Guides, whose appointment expired, was reappointed District Intelligence Officer.

No. 11 Military District:—

  • Colonel R.L. Wadmore, Officer Commanding, was retired, on pension.
  • Colonel A. Roy, M.V.O., was appointed Officer Commanding.
  • Major T.W.G. Bryan, Corps of Guides, was appointed District Intelligence Officer.
  • Major E.C. Hart, Permanent Army Medical Corps, whose appointment expired, was re-appointed Assistant Director of Medical Services.
Permanent Force Total expenditures, on March 31st 1913.4

Permanent Force Total expenditures, on March 31st 1913.4

(b) The extension of the Instructional Cadre, Signalling Staff and School of Musketry made early in 1912, and which largely increased the number of non-commissioned officer instructors, has added to the cost of the Force.

(c) The Revised Pay and Allowance Regulations which came into force on 1st January, 1912, provided for increased rates of allowances to officers and men living out of barracks, to enable them to obtain quarters, etc. An addition of about 50% was made to the rates previously in force, but many complaints have been made that existing rates are quite inadequate to provide’ suitable quarters in the larger cities. A private receives $10.50 a month Lodging allowance and a non-commissioned officer $13.50, except in the West, where rates are 822.00 and $30.00, respectively, a month. There can be no question that the rates are not sufficient to pay the rent of even a small house, especially in the East.

(d) Proficiency pay, for Cavalry and Infantry was also introduced on 1st January, 1912, to provide for a small increase of pay to men with over two years’ service who obtained special qualifications in Musketry and Signalling.

Permanent Force Expenditures on Pay, Allowances and supplies, by Station, 1912-13.5

Permanent Force Expenditures on Pay, Allowances and supplies, by Station, 1912-13.5

Permanent Force Expenditures on Pay, Allowances, For Officers and WO's, Mar., 3rd 1913.6

Permanent Force Expenditures on Pay, Allowances, For Officers and WO’s, Mar., 3rd 1913.6

Permanent Force Pay, Allowances of NCO's and Men for ending Mar. 31st., 1913. 7

Permanent Force Pay, Allowances of NCO’s and Men for ending Mar. 31st., 1913. 7

Permanent Force Pay, Allowances Of Officers and WO's, at Each Station, Ending Mar. 31st, 1913. 8.

Permanent Force Pay, Allowances Of Officers and WO’s, at Each Station, Ending Mar. 31st, 1913. 8.

Permanent Force Allowances, Pay for NCO's, and Men at Each Station, Mar. 31st, 1913. 9

Permanent Force Allowances, Pay for NCO’s, and Men at Each Station, Mar. 31st, 1913. 9

Permanent Force Expenditures for Provisions and Supplies, 1912-13. 10

Permanent Force Expenditures for Provisions and Supplies, 1912-13. 10

Permanent Force Changes in Strength Chart, from Apr. 1st, 1912 To Mar. 31st, 1913. 11

Permanent Force Changes in Strength Chart, from Apr. 1st, 1912 To Mar. 31st, 1913. 11

APPENDIX “B”

Ottawa, March 31st, 1913.

  • From—The Director-General, Medical Services, Canadian Militia.
  • To—The Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia.

Sir:—

I have the honour to submit my report upon the Medical Services during the year ending March 31st, 1913.

Troop Front. Canadian Mounted Rifles with Second Contingent South Africa, 1900 Winnipeg Ma.

Troop Front. Canadian Mounted Rifles with Second Contingent South Africa, 1900 Winnipeg Ma.

PERMANENT ARMY MEDICAL CORPS.

  1. The authorized strength of this Corps is still far below the number required to carry out its many duties, enumerated in my report of last year.

HEALTH OF THE TROOPS (PERMANENT).

  1. The decline in the incidence of sickness still continues—as may he seen from the attached tables. This decline is in spite of the unsuitable and unsanitary condition of many of the old barracks. A good deal has been done of late years to improve these old buildings; but it is an impossibility to render sanitary what is fundamentally unsanitary.
Permanent Force Medical Report Ending mar. 31st 1913., 12.

Permanent Force Medical Report Ending mar. 31st 1913., 12.

  • I have the honour to be, sir, Your obedient servant, G. C. JONES, Colonel, Director-General Medical Services.
B. Battery R.C.H.A. Renfrew Ont 1909.

B. Battery R.C.H.A. Renfrew Ont 1909.

APPENDIX “F”.

 INTERIM REPORT OF THE MILITIA COUNCIL FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA ON THE TRAINING OF THE MILITIA DURING THE SEASON OF 1912.

 

  • To His Royal Highness Field Marshal Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, K.G., K.T., K.P., &c., &c., &c., Governor- General and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of Canada.
  • Sir,—I have the honour to lay before Your Royal Highness an Interim Report on the training of the Militia of the Dominion of Canada, during the season of 1912;- to be embodied at a later date in the Report of the Militia Council for the year ending March 31, 1913.

I have the honour to be, sir. Your Royal Highness’ most obedient servant, SAM HUGHES, Minister of Militia and Defence. Jan. 15, 1913.

PERMANENT FORCE.

  1. As in 1911, all available troops of the mobile units of the Permanent Force were assembled at Petawawa for four weeks’ field training, as follows:—
  • Royal Canadian Dragoons (2 Squadrons)…………………..112.
  • Lord Strathcona’s Horse (2 Squadrons)…………………….113.
  • Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (Brigade of 2 batteries)…..252.
  • Royal Canadian Engineers (2nd Field Company)……………85.
  • Royal Canadian Regiment (Battalion of 8 companies)…….570.
  • Administrative troops………………………………………109.
  • Total………………………………………………………1,241.

Two weeks were devoted to regimental training and two weeks to the combined training of all arms.

ARMY SERVICE CORPS.

  1. The numerical weakness of the Canadian Permanent Army Service Corps rendered it necessary to fall back upon the units of the Canadian Army Service Corps for assistance in carrying out the administrative services, supply and transport, of the various camps, thus preventing the latter units from receiving the training for war which is necessary.
H.R.H. Prince Arthur and officers of Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers, Halifax, N.S., 1912.

H.R.H. Prince Arthur and officers of Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers, Halifax, N.S., 1912.

APPENDIX B.

  • From,—The Inspector-General, Canadian Militia.
  • To—The Secretary, Militia Council.

Ottawa, November 30, 1912.

Sir,—I have the honour to submit for the information of the Hon. the Minister in Militia Council, my report for 1912, upon the training and efficiency, suitability and sufficiency of equipment, and the readiness and fitness of the Military Forces of Canada for war, together with the condition of the fortifications and defences of the country.

TRAINING.

  1. Funds were provided for the training of the whole of the Active Militia, also for a large part of the Permanent Corps at Petawawa.
  2. Again, as last year, I propose dealing with the respective merits of the two classes of our forces, viz.. Permanent Corps and Active Militia, separately, and each by arms and departments of the service.

PERMANENT CORPS.

  1. Difficulty is still found in maintaining the permanent units up to their establishment, the same reasons prevailing, viz., the abundance of civil employment at high wages.
  2. I found that the percentage of men discharged was greatly in excess of enlistments, and the outlook for suitable recruits to fill vacancies very dubious.
  3. That the demands made upo^ these units from all sources can be fully met from the present reduced establishment, is not in evidence.
  4. The difference between the present strength and normal establishment, some 550 all ranks, is in my opinion a deficit to be made good, and the least number to ensure an adequate service.
  5. The selection of suitable candidates for commissions, and officers to fill staff appointments is also for particular consideration, as our service calls for greater competency than most others, and the danger of adverse criticism ever present.
  6. The concentration again of a large part of the corps for a month’s combined training at Petawawa, under the personal supervision of the Chief of General Staff, proved very successful; intelligence and interest being shown by all ranks engaged.
  7. The “Royal Canadian Dragoons” continues to maintain a good standard of efficiency, and fulfils the duties of an instructional corps as satisfactory as its limited accommodation and educational facilities permit.
  8. The second squadron of the “Lord Strathcona’s Horse” has recently been formed, and evidently given new life to the organization, which though undermanned shows a determination to become very proficient.
  9. The location of the regiment in a new and fast growing country gives it particular value, and will call for more than ordinary capability in the matter of instruction, and example. 58. The Horse and Heavy Batteries, and Coast Defence Companies of the Royal Canadian Artillery, can be reported in a very satisfactory state, barring the numerical weakness of the last named branch.
  10. To the Royal Canadian Engineers but little time can be allowed for field training, the duties pertaining to works, repairs and fortress requirements being already in excess of what the present personnel can reasonably discharge.
  11. These duties are satisfactorily done within their limitations, though until increased strength is procurable, training must suffer.
  12. The further development of the Instructional Staff and more non-commissioned officers and men appear as prominent factors for favourable attention, otherwise additional calls for its services cannot be met
  13. The Royal Canadian Regiment took part in the month’s combined training at Petawawa to its advantage and increased efficiency.
  14. In keeping up its strength, this unit has experienced similar difficulties found in others of the same class.
  15. The sudden and large demand lately made upon the regiment for qualified instructors has more or less upset its regular administration, yet no pains were seemingly spared to quickly comply with the call and give the best material that was at hand, or could be turned out at short notice.
  16. The units of the permanent branch of the Army Service Corps can be reported as having made progress during the year. Improvements have been effected, and with the presence of a special officer from the Imperial Service, further advancement and the induction of a good system may be expected.
  17. The personnel and administration of the Permanent Army Medical Corps continues good.
  18. As the Permanent Army Veterinary Corps is in a state of organization there is nothing of moment to record.
  19. In the Ordnance Corps (permanent), perhaps the greatest difficulties to efficient administration are found.
  20. The difficulties here most apparent are those which only time and money will eradicate, and the following are most conspicuous:—
  • (e) The lack of “general,” “reserve” and “mobilization” equipment, and in the latter case, want of a record of what is needed, and its quick acquisition.
  • (d) Insufficiency of personnel, or perhaps a combination of civil and military, not subject to the same regulations and control, and therefore not of the same ideas or method in the discharge of their duties to the service.
  • (c) Proper fire protection often wanting.
  • (b) The absence of quarters for non-commissioned officers and men.
  • (a)The inadequacy of store buildings.

These requirements necessarily involve—

  • (a) Defects in the methodical classification, protection and easy disposition of stores.
  • (b) Delay in the assembly of the personnel in time of pressure.
  • (c) Danger of destruction to valuable property.
  • (d) Impossibility of keeping pace with the administration entailed.
  • (e) The unreadiness in time of need.
  1. The Canadian Army Pay Corps can be reported in very good condition, and fully competent to deal with all matters pertaining to its branch.
  2. The system of instruction to its personnel is practical and sound.
  3. The main defect observed by me was the absence of any means for the safe custody of the records in use by the several detachments.
  • I have the honour to be, Sir, Your obedient servant, W. D. OTTER, Major-General,Inspector-General.

Spañard

.

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2 thoughts on “Canada’s “Permanent Force” Annual Militia Report, Year Ending Mar. 31st, 1913.

  1. My uncle Edgar Frances Jackson was in the Royal Canadian Garrison Artiliary, he died on the 28th June and was burried on the 29th June 1912, I was wondering if you had any information of his cause of death and where he died? He was stationed at Quebec.

    Like

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