Québec Tercentenary Celebration July 1908, Militia Participation Report.

APPENDIX E,(II).

 

Ottawa, March 23, 1909.

  • From the Officer Commanding the Canadian Militia, Quebec Tercentenary Celebration.
  • To the Secretary the Militia Council, Ottawa.

Sir,—I have the honour to submit a report for the information of the Honourable the Minister in Militia Council, on the part taken by the Canadian Militia in the Quebec Tercentenary Celebration, on which occasion close on 14,000 men of all arms (excluding naval contingents) were collected together at Quebec, the largest concentration of Canadian troops ever yet effected.

  1. The original intention was to concentrate a force which would have amounted to some 25,000 or 30,000 men; but for various reasons the scheme was found to be impracticable. The expense would have been very heavy; there arose difficulties connected with pay, and with annual drill and training; the transport of so many troops, in addition to crowds of visitors, would have imposed a severe strain on railway and steamboat companies; suitable camping grounds, within a reasonable distance of Quebec, were not easy to obtain; and on the Levis side of the river, although there was plenty of space, the supply of drinking water and the carrying capacity of the available ferry-boats were both restricted.
  2. At one time, indeed, the obstacles in the way of carrying out a concentration appeared so formidable that, about the middle of May, it was decided to order all corps to perform their annual training, as usual, in camps of instruction and at local headquarters; to place at the disposal of the National Battlefields Commission a sufficient number of the Permanent Force to furnish escorts and guards of honour; and, in the event of additional troops being required, to provide transport and subsistence for such other regiments as the Commission might invite to attend, up to a total strength not to exceed 5,000 of all ranks, excluding the Quebec city corps, and at a cost, estimated at $85,000, not to be charged against the appropriation of $1,000,000 for annual training.
  3. But early in June, at the earnest request of the President of the Battlefields Commission, it was finally decided that not less than 12,000 men, representing all arms and branches of the service, should be permitted to take part in the Celebration. City and rural corps were to be provided with transport and subsistence, but, except in the case of corps performing at Quebec at the time of the Celebration their annual course of training, they were to receive no pay.
  4. I had the honour to be entrusted with the organization and, subsequently, the command of the force, and with the assistance of my colleagues on the Militia Council, I prepared a scheme and completed preliminary arrangements.
  5. I assumed command on the 14th July, and with the following Staff, established my Headquarters at the Court House, which had been kindly lent for the purpose:—
  • Asst. Military Secretary.—Brev. Col. W. G. Gwatkin.
  • A.D.C.—Capt. E. de B. Panet, R.C.H.A.
  • Capt. D. D. Young, R.C.D.
  • Capt. L. S. Macoun, 5th Princess Louise D.G. (extra).
  • Lt. S. C. S. Kerr, Royal Grenadiers, (extra).
  • Chief Staff Officer.—Colonel F. L. Lessard, C.B., A.D.C.
  • Asst. Adjutant-General.—Major H. A. Panet, D.S.O., RCA.
  • Deputy Asst. Adjutants-General.—Lt. Col. A. T. Thompson, 37th Regt.;
  • Lt.-Col. O.E. Talbot, 17th Regt.
  • Asst. Quartermaster-General.—Lt. Col. J. L. Biggar, C.P.A.S.C.
  • Deputy Asst. Quartermasters-General.—Lt. Col. J. G. Langton, C.A.S.C.;
  • Major G. A. Dodge, C.P.A.S.C.
  • Officer Commanding Artillery.—Colonel T. Benson, R.C.A.
  • Staff Officer for Engineer Services.—Capt, W. L. de M. Carey, R.O.E.
  • Intelligence Officer (Railway).—Brev. Col. S. Hughes.
  • Principal Medical Officer.—Lt. Col. G. C. Jones, P.A.M.C., G.G.H.S.
  • Sanitary Officer.—Major L. Drum, P.A.M.C.
  • Principal Veterinary Officer.—Yet. Lt. Col. TV. B. Hall, R.C.D.
  • Principal Ordnance Officer.—Lt. Col. R. K Scott, D.S.O., C.O.C.
  • Chief Paymaster.—Major W. R. Ward, C.A.P.C.
  • Provost Marshal.—Capt. W. P. Butcher. R.C.R.
Infantry detachments from Ontario in the Québec Tercentenary military review.

Infantry detachments from Ontario in the Québec Tercentenary military review.7

  1. The force was organized as shown below:—

(I) Gentlemen Cadets, Royal Military College of Canada.

  • One Company.—Major E. N. Mozley, R.E.

(II) Corps Troops.

  • Royal Canadian Horse Artillery.—Lt. Col. H. E. Burstall.
  • Royal Canadian Dragoons.—Lt. Col. V. A. S. Williams, A.D.C.
  • Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery.—Lt. Col. C. E. English.
  • Royal Canadian Engineers.—Major J. Houliston.
  • Royal Canadian Regiment.—Lt. Col. R. L. Wadmore.
  • Canadian Permanent Army Service Corps.—Capt E. C. Dean.
  • Permanent Army Medical Corps.—Lt. Col. C. W. Belton.
  • Canadian Ordnance Corps.—Lt. Col. J. A. Morin.
  • Canadian Army Pay Corps.—Major S. J. R. Sircom.

(III) 1st Division.

  • Headquarters.
  • Officer Commanding.—Brig. General W. H. Cotton.
  • Orderly Officer.—Lt, A. V. S. Nordheimer, R.C.D.
  • Asst. Adjutant-General.—Lt. Col. A. Bertram.
  • Deputy Asst. Adjutant-General.—Major A. E. Carpenter, R.C.R.
  • Divisional Engineer.—Capt. W. B. Lindsay, R.C.E.
  • Administrative Medical and Sanitary Officer.—Lt, Col. W. Nattress, P.A.M.C.
  • Divisional Paymaster.—Capt. C. N. Shanly, C.A.P.C.

1st Western Ontario Brigade.

(Québec Tercentenary) Lord Roberts, Queen's Own Rifles, leads them past the Prince of Wales in the Military Review. Quebec July 24th 1908.

(Québec Tercentenary) Lord Roberts, Queen’s Own Rifles, leads them past the Prince of Wales in the Military Review. Quebec July 24th 1908.

  • Officer Commanding.—Lt. Col. J. W. Little.
  • Brigade Major.—Major S. C. Newburn.
  • 7th Fusiliers.—Lt. Col. F. Reid.
  • 13th Regiment.—Lt. Col. E. E. W. Moore.
  • 21st Essex Fusiliers.— Lt. Col. F. H. Laing.
  • 91st Canadian Highlanders.—Lt. Col. W. A. Logie.

2nd Western Ontario Brigade.

  • Officer Commanding.—Lt. Col. “W. C. Macdonald.
  • Brigade Major.—Lt. Col. W. C. V. Cbadwick, 9th Mississauga Horse.
  • 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles.—Colonel Sir H. M. Pellatt, A.D.C.
  • 10th Royal Grenadiers.—Lt. Col. A. E. Gooderham.
  • 48th Highlanders.—Lt. Col. D. M. Robertson.

Divisional Troops.

  • Corps of Guides.—Capt. R. W. Leonard.
  • No. 6 Co. Canadian Army Service Corps.—Major W. M. Tomlinson.
  • No. V Field Ambulance (for 1st and 2nd Divisions).—Lt. Col. K. Cameron.

(IV) 2nd Division.

Headquarters.

  • Officer Commanding.—Colonel W. D. Gordon.
  • Orderly Officer.—Capt. A. S. A. M. Adamson, G.G.F.G.
  • Asst. Adjutant-General.—Lt. Col. T. D. R. Hemming, R.C.R.
  • Deputy Asst. Adjutant-General.—Lt. Col. D. D. Young, R.C.R.
  • Administrative Medical and Sanitary Officer.—Lt. Col. H. R Duff, P.A.M.C.
  • Divisional Paymaster.—Capt. W. S. Conger, C.A.P.C.

3rd Western Ontario Brigade.

  • Officer Commanding.—Lt. Col. J. Mason.
  • Brigade Major.—Lt. Col. W. BZ. Ptolemy, 77th Regt.

1st Composite Battalion.—Lt. Col. R. MacKenzie, 27th Lambton Regiment (St. Clair Borderers)—composed of companies from the following regiments:—

  • 24th Kent Regiment.
  • 25th Regiment, 26th Middlesex Light Infantry.
  • 27th Lambton Regiment (St. Clair Borderers).
  • 28th Perth Regiment, 29th Waterloo Regiment.
  • 32nd Bruce Regiment, 33rd Huron Regiment.

2nd Composite Battalion.—Lt. Col. W. Wallace, 36th Peel Regiment—composed of companies from the following regiments:—

  • 12th York Rangers, 19th St. Catharines Regiment.
  • 23rd Northern Pioneers.
  • 31st Grey Regiment.
  • 34th Ontario Regiment.
  • 35th Simcoe Foresters.
  • 36th Peel Regiment, 44th Lincoln and Welland Regiment.
  • 77th Wentworth Regiment.

3rd Composite Battalion.—Lt. Col. W. P. Moore, 20th Halton Regiment—composed of companies from the following Rifle regiments :—

(Québec Tercentenary) The 11th Hussars from Richmond, P.Q. Quebec.

(Québec Tercentenary) The 11th Hussars from Richmond, P.Q. Quebec.

  • 20th Halton Regiment (“Lome Rifles”),
  • 22nd Oxford Rifles,
  • 30th Wellington Rifles.
  • 37th HaHimand Rifles,
  • 38th DufTerin Rifles,
  • 39th Norfolk Rifles,
  • 97th Algonquin Rifles.

4th Eastern Ontario Brigade.

  • Officer Commanding—Lt. Col. J. Hughes.
  • Brigade Major—Capt. E. E. Clarke.
  • The Governor General’s Foot Guards—Lt. Col. D. R. Street.
  • 14th Prince of Wales Own Rifles (with a company of the 49th Hastings Rifles
  • 1 coy of the 56th Grenville Regiment “Lisgar Rifles ” attached)—Lt. Col. R- E. Kent.
  • 43rd Duke of Cornwall’s Own Rifles
  • 1 Coy of the 41st Brockville Rifles attached)—Lt. Col. S. M. Rogers.

4th Composite Battalion.—Lt. Col. R. H. Sylvester, 45th Regiment—composed of companies from the following regiments:—

  • 15th Argyle Light Infantry.

    (Québec Tercentenary) The 11th Hussars from Richmond, P.Q. Quebec.

    (Québec Tercentenary) The 11th Hussars from Richmond, P.Q. Quebec.

  • 16th Prince Edward Regiment.
  • 40th Northumberland Regiment.
  • 42nd Lanark and Renfrew Regiment.
  •  45th Victoria Regiment.
  • 46thDurham Regiment.
  • 47th Frontenac Regiment.
  • 57th Peterborough Rangers.
  •  59th Stormont and Glengarry Regiment.

Divisional Troops.

No. 5 Co., Canadian Army Service Corps—Major S. E. de la Ronde.

(V) 3rd Division.

Headquarters.

  • Officer Commanding—Brlg.-Gen. L. Buchan, C.V.O., C.MG., A.D.C.
  • Orderly Officer—Lieut. W. J. Press, 2nd Regiment C.A.
  • Asst. Adjutant-General—Lt. Col. J. S. Dunbar.
  • Deputy Asst. Adjutant-General—Lt. Col. W. J. Stewart, C.A.S.C.
  • Divisional Engineer—Major J. Houliston, R.C.E.
  • Administrative Medical and Sanitary Officer—Lt. Col. G. S. Rennie, A.M.C.
  • Divisional Paymaster—Capt. A. O. Lambert, C.A.P.C.

5th Quebec Brigade.

  • Officer Commanding—Lt. Col. E. B. Ibbotson.
  • Brigade Major—Major J. T. Ostell, 65th Regiment.
  • 3rd Victoria Rifles of Canada—Lt.-Col. R. Starke.
  • 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada—Lt.-Col. J. Carson.
  • 65th Carabiniers Mont-Royal (with one company of the 64th Chateauguay and
  • Beauharnois Regiment attached)—Lt.-Col. A. E. D. Labelle.

5th Composite Battalion—Lt. Col. A. T. Patterson, 85th Regiment—composed of companies from the following regiments:—

  • 11th Argenteuil Rangers.
  • 53rd Sherbrooke Regiment.
  • 84th St. Hyacinthe Regiment.
  • 85th Regiment.

6th Quebec Brigade.

(Québec Terecentenary) Montreal Artillery in the military parade July 1908.

(Québec Terecentenary) Montreal Artillery in the military parade July 1908.

  • Officer Commanding—Lt.-Col. G. E. A. Jones.
  • Brigade Major—Capt. J. P. G. Ouellet.
  • 8th Royal Rifles—Lt.-Col. W. C. H. Wood.
  • 9th Voltigeurs de Quebec.—Lt. Col. O. Evanturel.
  • 6th Composite Battalion (formation abandoned).

7th Maritime Provinces Brigade.

  • Officer Commanding—Lt.-Col. H. H. McLean.
  • Brigade Major—Lt.-Col. H. M. Campbell.
  • 62nd St. John Eusiliers—Lt.-Col. M. B. Edwards.

7th Composite Battalion—Lt. Col. J. W. Baker, 67th Regiment—composed of companies from the following regiments:—

  • 67th Carleton Light Infantry.
  • 69th Annapolis Regiment.
  • 71st York Regiment.
  • 73rd Northumberland Regiment.
  • 74th Brunswick Rangers.
  • 82nd Abegweit Light Infantry Regiment.

Divisional Troops.

  • No. 5 Section Signalling Corps—Capt. C. H. E. de Blois.
  • No. 10 Company, Canadian Army Service Corps—Major J. N. R. Guay.
  • Composite Field Ambulance—Major C. H. Gilmour.

(VI) Cavalry Brigade.

  • Officer Commanding—Lt.-Col. R. E. W. Turner, V.C., D.S.O.

    (Québec Tercentenary) Representatives of the Infantry from Quebec City, July 1908.

    (Québec Tercentenary) Representatives of the Infantry from Quebec City, July 1908.

  • Orderly Officer—Major A. J. Price, 10th Hussars.
  • Brigade Major—Major C. M. Nelles, R.C.D.
  • 6th Duke of Connaught’s Royal Canadian Hussars—Lt.-Col. J. G. Barr.
  • 7th Hussars—Lt.-Col. O. R. Pope.
  • 10th Queen’s Own Canadian Hussars—Lt.-Col. A. F. Ashmead.
  • 11th Hussars—Lt.-Col. E. B. Worthington.
  • 13th Scottish Light Dragoons—Lt.-Col. D. M. Stewart.
  • 17th Duke of York’s Royal Canadian Hussars—Lt.-Col. R. A. Brock.

(VII) Field Artillery.

  • Commanding—Lt.-Col. J. Davidson.
  • Brigade Major—Major W. C. Good.
  • 6th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery (3rd and 21st Batteries)—Lt.-Col. W. A. Grant.
  • 7th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery (15th and 22nd Batteries)—Lt.-Col. K. Costigan.

(VIII) Garrison Artillery.

Composite Regiment drawn from:—

  • 2nd Montreal Regiment.
  • 3rd New Brunswick Regiment, Cobourg Company—Lt.-Col. H. McL. Davison.
  • 6th Quebec and Levis Regiment Canadian Artillery—Lt.-Col. J. O. Martineau.

(IX) Field Engineers.

4th Field Company—Major S. Howard.

(X) Western Contingent.

  • Officer Commanding—Lt.-Col. J. A. Hall, 5th Regiment, Canadian Artillery.
  • Adjutant—Lieut. P. T. Stern, 5th Regiment, Canadian Artillery.
  • Medical Officer—Capt. D. S. MacKay, Army Medical Corps.
  • Quartermaster—Major L. J. O. Ducharme, 13th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery. Representative detachments, of all arms, from Military Districts No. 10, 11, and 13.
  1. On the evening of the 14th July the British Squadron began to assemble. The Vice-Admiral Commanding, the Honourable Sir A. G. Curzon-Howe, K.C.B., landed on the following morning and received a salute of 17 guns. The Squadron included the battleships Ex-mouth, Albemarle, Russell and Duncan, and the protected cruisers Arrogant and Venus. Between His Majesty’s ships and the Citadel there was of course no exchange of artillery salutes.
  2. On the 17th, Field Marshal Earl Roberts arrived. He came, at the King’s command, to represent the British Army. He was given a salute of 19 guns, and was received at the landing stage by a guard of honour furnished by the Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. Lt. Col. S. Denison, C.M.G., Royal Canadian Regiment, was detailed to act as personal Aide-de-Camp.
  3. On the same day the French battleships Amiral Aube and Leon Gambetta came to anchor; and as the representative of the French Republic, Vice-Admiral Jaureguiberry was received with military honours and a salute of 19 guns. Lt. Col. O. Pelletier was attached to the Vice-Admiral’s staff.
  4. Meanwhile the troops had been arriving, and transport arrangements worked smoothly and well. The concentration was practically completed by the 21st, on which date the strength of the several organizations was as shown below:
Québec Tercentenary Celebration Militia Participation Report, 1.

Québec Tercentenary Celebration Militia Participation Report, 1.

  1. Vice-President Fairbanks arrived on the morning of the 22nd. He had been preceded, the day before, by the United States battleship New Hampshire (Rear- Admiral Cowles). He was given a salute of 19 guns and was received by guards of honour as the representative of the neighbouring Republic. The services of Lieut.- Colonel V. A. S. Williams, A.D.C., were placed at his disposal.
  2. On the afternoon of the same day the Prince of “Wales arrived in the armoured cruiser Indomitable escorted by the armoured cruiser Minotaur. His Royal Highness landed at 4 p.m. and drove to the Citadel, where quarters had been prepared for his reception, and where His Excellency the Governor-General was already in residence. The 43rd Duke of Cornwall’s Own Rifles furnished the guard of honour at the King’s wharf. Troops lined the streets from the landing stage, by Mountain Hill, to the Citadel gates; and a mounted escort was furnished by the Royal Canadian Dragoons.
  3. The latter regiment, it may be remarked, as well as the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, the Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery, the Royal Canadian Regiment and the Royal Northwest Mounted Police were constantly under arms while the Celebration was in progress, and they never failed in the performance of their duties. The Prince of Wales has shown his appreciation of the services rendered by the Royal Canadian Dragoons by consenting recently to become their honorary colonel.
  4. On the morning of the 23rd, there was a rehearsal, on the Plains of Abraham, of the Royal Review which was to be held there next day. As opposite the saluting base there was not enough room to allow all the troops to be deployed on the same alignment, they had to be formed in three successive lines, on rough and uneven ground. In rear of the saluting-point there had been erected a grand stand which, with the enclosures on either side of it, still further restricted the space available. Another encroachment which interfered to no little extent with movements and formations, was a stand which had been erected at the west end of the Plains, in connection with the arrangements for the Pageant. In the circumstances it was no easy task to handle troops in mass.
  5. After the parade was over, the troops marched back through the city to their several camps ; and in the afternoon, when a civic address of welcome was presented to His Royal Highness, a strong detachment (under Colonel Gordon) lined the streets from the Citadel, where the 13th Regiment was on duty, to the Champlain Monument, where a guard of honour was furnished by the 48th Highlanders.
  6. In the forenoon, while naval visits were being returned by the Prince, the 3rd Victoria Rifles were posted at the King’s Wharf; and in the evening, during a State dinner given at the Citadel, a guard of honour was mounted by the 62nd St. John Fusiliers.
  7. The Royal Review was held on the morning of the 24th. The parade-state handed to the Prince showed the following figures:—
Québec Tercentenary Celebration Militia Participation Report, 2.

Québec Tercentenary Celebration Militia Participation Report, 2.

Québec Tercentenary Celebration Militia Participation Report, 3.

Québec Tercentenary Celebration Militia Participation Report, 3.

  1. Including Militia, Naval Contingents, and the Royal Northwest Mounted Police there was therefore on parade under arms a force of nearly 15,000 men.
  2. Before coming on parade, the Prince of Wales visited Wolfe’s Monument, where there was mounted a guard of honour found, in equal proportions, by the 1st and 2nd Composite Battalions of the 3rd Infantry Brigade.
  3. On attendance on His Royal Highness during the Review were His Excellency the Governor-General (whose personal staff included Lt. Col. A. Roy, Lt. Col. A. P. Sherwood, and Lt. Co, O. B. Shore, 18th Tiwana Lancers), the Honourable the Minister of Militia and Defence, Field Marshal Earl Roberts (who led past the Royal Canadian Artillery and the 2nd Queen’s Own Rifles, of which two corps he is honorary eclonel), Major-General Lake, Inspector-General, and, representing the Militia Council, Brigadier-General D. A. Macdonald, Quartermaster-General, and Colonel R. W. Rutherford, Master-General of the Ordnance.
  4. The manner in which the regiments formed up, marched past, and moved away, gave evidence of good staff work and skilful handling. The difficulties of the situation have already been explained, and it was only due to orders being clearly worded, properly communicated and strictly obeyed, that the troops were enabled to carry out what was required of them without check or interruption
5th Regt. RHC (Black Watch) Québec Tercentenary)Highlanders, 1908 Qubec City.1jpg

5th Regt. RHC (Black Watch) Québec Tercentenary)Highlanders, 1908 Qubec City.

  1. Where every man did his best, it would be invidious to make comparisons; but a word of praise is due to the soldier-like bearing of the infantry battalions composed of rural companies.
  2. From the saluting-point the Prince proceeded to the Monument aux Braves where he was met by the Governor General’s Foot Guards; and in the evening he attended an official ball given by the Government of the Province of Quebec, in the Parliament House, where the 7th Fusiliers posted a guard of honour, the 13th Scottish Light Dragoons furnishing a mounted escort.
  3. The regiments began to return home on the night of the 24th July, and only sufficient men were kept at Quebec to furnish guards and escorts. The transport service had been carefully arranged with the railway companies whose officials were always ready to co-operate and to render all possible assistance. The departure of troops continued during the 25th, 26th, 27th and 28th, and entrainment proceeded with punctuality and without trouble or confusion.
  4. On the 25th there was a Naval Review, and the Royal Canadian Regiment mounted a guard of honour at the King’s Wharf. Afterwards there was a State performance of the Pageant on the Plains, and a mounted escort was furnished by the 17th Duke of York’s Royal Canadian Hussars.
  5. On the forenoon of the 28th the Prince proceeded to Victoria Park, where the 21st Essex Fusiliers (which regiment had volunteered to stay behind) posted a guard of honour; and in the afternoon the Royal Canadian Regiment performed a similar duty at Spencer “Wood where His Royal Highness was received by the Lieutenant- Governor of the Province of Quebec.
(Québec Tercentenary) Fraser Highlanders, 1908 Quebec City.

(Québec Tercentenary) Fraser Highlanders, 1908 Quebec City.

  1. From the saluting-point the Prince proceeded to the Monument aux Braves where he was met by the Governor General’s Foot Guards; and in the evening he attended an official ball given by the Government of the Province of Quebec, in the Parliament House, where the 7th Fusiliers posted a guard of honour, the 13th Scottish Light Dragoons furnishing a mounted escort.
  2. The regiments began to return home on the night of the 24th July, and only sufficient men were kept at Quebec to furnish guards and escorts. The transport service had been carefully arranged with the railway companies whose officials were always ready to co-operate and to render all possible assistance. The departure of troops continued during the 25th, 26th, 27th and 28th, and entrainment proceeded with punctuality and without trouble or confusion.
  3. On the 25th there was a Naval Review, and the Royal Canadian Regiment mounted a guard of honour at the King’s Wharf. Afterwards there was a State performance of the Pageant on the Plains, and a mounted escort was furnished by the 17th Duke of York’s Royal Canadian Hussars.
  4. On the forenoon of the 28th the Prince proceeded to Victoria Park, where the 21st Essex Fusiliers (which regiment had volunteered to stay behind) posted a guard of honour; and in the afternoon the Royal Canadian Regiment performed a similar duty at Spencer “Wood where His Royal Highness was received by the Lieutenant- Governor of the Province of Quebec.
(Québec Tercentenary) Troops passing Champlain Market.

(Québec Tercentenary) Troops passing Champlain Market.

  1. In the evening of the same day the Prince of Wales left the Citadel (troops lining the streets) and re-embarked; but it was not until early morning next day that the Indomitable weighed anchor.
  2. The following is a copy of correspondence which passed betweeen the Prince of

Wales’ Private Secretary and the Honourable the Minister of Militia and Defence:—

” Dear Sir Frederick Borden,—

” The Prince of Wales directs me to convey to you the expression of his high appreciation of the very successful Review of the Canadian Militia, which His Royal Highness had the great pleasure of holding this morning. He is well aware that the work of conveying so large a body of men and horses to Quebec must have entailed much heavy work and careful organization; also that many of the troops could only have been present at considerable individual sacrifice.

” The Prince heartily congratulates you, Brigadier-General Otter and the Staff, upon the happy results of your efforts. The march-past was extremely well carried out, and His Royal Highness hopes that you will convey to all ranks his congratulations on the smart soldier-like bearing and steadiness on parade of the Canadian troops.

Believe me, Yours very faithfully, ARTHUR BIGGE. Citadel, Quebec, 24th July, 1903.

  • reply.

” Dear Sir Arthur Bigge,—

On behalf of myself, Brigadier-General Otter, and Staff, and the Canadian Militia generally, I beg to acknowledge our deep gratitude for the kind and gracious words of appreciation in which the Prince of Wales has been pleased to refer to the Review held by His Royal Highness to-day. Such words of commendation coming from His Royal Highness will, I feel sure, stimulate us all to put forth still greater efforts towards efficiency and will far more than repay the troops immediately concerned for any inconvenience or sacrifice involved in leaving their homes at this busy season of the year.

“Believe me, Yours very truly, F. W. BORDEN.”

Quebec, 24th July, 1908.”

  1. The contents of the foregoing letters were published in Orders as also were the following messages:—

“The Governor-General shares with the troops the pleasure they have derived from the compliments paid them by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and His Excellency desires to offer all ranks his personal congratulations.”

“Sir Frederick Borden desires to place on record his appreciation of the efforts which have been made to bring to a successful issue the concentration of the Militia at Quebec and Levis, and he congratulates all ranks on the excellence of the results obtained.”

  1. On the 30th July, the following order was issued:—

“In connection with the concentration at Quebec and Levis, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales has been pleased to congratulate the troops on their appearance under arms, to recognize that sacrifices have been made, and to refer to hard work and careful organization.” His Excellency the Governor-General and the Honourable the Minister have also expressed their satisfaction with the results which have been obtained, and the Brigadier-General Commanding has only to add that the troops have conducted themselves in a manner which reflects credit on their state of discipline, and on relinquishing command, he gratefully acknowledges the support which he has received from all associated with him in celebrating the Quebec Tercentenary.”

  1. With the exception of units and detachments forming part of the normal garrison of Quebec the troops lived under canvas. The Gentlemen Cadets and the Corps Troops were accommodated on De Salaberry Square; the 1st (Brig. Gen. Cotton’s) Division, to which were attached the Cavalry Brigade and the Western Contingent, were encamped at West Savard; the 2nd (Col. Gordon’s) Division, with the Field Artillery, Garrison Artillery and Field Engineers, at East Savard; the 3rd (Brig. Gen. Buchan’s) Division, at Levis.
  2. No pains were spared to render life in camp as comfortable as circumstances permitted. In connection with the issue of supplies, the Army Service Corps deserves commendation; and as regards the provision of stores and equipment the Ordnance Corps succeeded in meeting all demands.

    (Québec Tercentenary) Representatives of the 5th Regiment, Royal Highlanders of Canada, Quebec City, July 1908.1

    (Québec Tercentenary) Representatives of the 5th Regiment, Royal Highlanders of Canada, Quebec City, July 1908.1

  1. Also the Army Medical Corps did excellent service, and, in spite of the intense heat, the health of the troops was good. But owing to the unfortunate fact that the city water supply was cut off on one occasion during the hottest time of the day, it was impossible to prevent men drinking from polluted sources in the neighbourhood of the camps. As a result, cases of enteric which developed after the men had left Quebec, occurred among the troops encamped on De Salaberry Square. All, however, did well. A few cases also occurred among the troops encamped at East and West Savard, owing to water being taken from the St. Charles River for drinking purposes.
  2. There was one fatal accident, Private R. Stevenson, 90th Regiment, Winnipeg Rifles, was drowned in the St. Charles River. The Prince of Wales with characteristic kindliness caused an expression of his sympathy to be conveyed to Private Stevenson’s family and comrades.
  3. On the whole, however, very few accidents occurred, in spite of the slippery state of the streets and the number of horses which were picketed out in the open.
  4. In conclusion there is no doubt that although the work of the Militia on this occasion was mainly of a ceremonial character the concentration of such a large number of troops proved a valuable military experience. It afforded practice in the execution of staff duties, especially in connection with transport, supply and general administration, as well as in the handling of large bodies of troops in mass; it stimulated the enthusiasm of all engaged, and served as a means of popular education.
  • I have the honour to be, sir.
  • Your obedient servant, W. D. OTTER. Brigadier-General.

Spañard

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2 thoughts on “Québec Tercentenary Celebration July 1908, Militia Participation Report.

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